Using Technology to Engage Citizens with Well-being Statistics – Perspectives from Official Statistics and Government

27 October 2014 09:00 – 17:00

OECD, Paris

The use of technology to engage citizens with well-being statistics is a relatively new area, and the purpose of this workshop is to explore experiences and best practices from national statistics offices and governments.

Context:

The use of technology to engage citizens with well-being statistics is a relatively new area, and the purpose of this workshop is to explore experiences and best practices from national statistis offices and government. While technology offers a great potential to involve the public in well-being measurement, there are also challenges – such as sampling issues with crowd sourced data – and the workshops will provide an opportunity to scope out both the limitations as well as the potential of different methods. The findings from the workshop will be made available in a summary report, as well as live webcasts of the sessions being made available on the Wikiprogress website

“A critical factor is the need for wider civil society to also hold Government to account. What we choose to measure defines what is important, and what Government focuses its effort on. If we want Government to be more ambitious and focus on delivery of well-being, wider open and public discussion will be crucial” Stiglitz-Sen-Fitoussi report, 2009

Finding ways to get citizens and communities more involved in the development and use of well-being statistics is an important objective for data producers wanting to maximise the policy impact and relevance of improved measures. Many national and local initiatives are recognising this by consulting with the public when developing measurement frameworks and selecting indicators. Many of these consultations are through face-to-face events and surveys, and these methods can be highly effective. However, interactive technology and web platforms allow the possibility to reach out to a much wider audience, and to engage citizens in a number of different ways beyond consultation.

These include:

-To include people in the development of well-being frameworks (e.g. through online consultation tools and social media)

-To engage people in the findings and analysis of well-being indicators (e.g. through interactive data visualisation tools)

-To engage citizens as data interpreters (e.g. through government open data initiatives, or through the ‘civic tech’ movement)

-To engage citizens as data producers themselves (e.g. through technology that allows for the crowdsourcing of well-being data using GIS or self-reporting such as ‘Mappiness’, and through the gathering of well being preferences on the OECD Better Life Index)

This is the second of two workshop that will focus on the use of digital technology to engage citizen with well-being data and statistics. The first workshop took place on 18 September 2014 and explored perspectives from civil society and academia, to see presentations and film, click here.

Speakers:

Loretta Anania

Prior to joining the RACE broadband activities of the European Commission, Dr Anania received a PhD from MIT with a thesis on Networks in the Information society.

Donatella Fazio

Is Senior Statistician at Istat is Head of the “R&D Projects” Unit in the Directorate of Development of Information Systems and Corporate Products, Information Management and Quality Assessment.

Kate Scrivens

Has 11 years’ experience at the OECD, working in the Public Affairs and Communications directorate as a campaign manager, and since 2008 in the Statistics Directorate as a researcher working on issues of progress and well-being.

Registration:

This workshop is by invitation only, if you are interested in attending please contact: Salema.GULBAHAR@oecd.org  OR info@wikiprogress.org.

For further information and to watch the live webcast, visit the website.

 

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